Adam Kadmon

Adam was not the first man
‘Though the Bible tells us soEden

There was one created before him
Whose name we do not knowNara

He also lived in the garden
But he had no mouth or eyesAdam-3 2

One day Adam came to kill himAdam-4 3

And he died beneath these skiesAdam-5 2


These verses are taken from the song Pet Politics by the Silver Jews:

Pet Politics – The Silver Jews

The featured image for this post comes from this website:

Piper Mackay Photography

See post: Nara

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Nara

The Nara-Narayana theme is common in the story-telling of many ancient civilizations.  It involves an adventure between the primeval man (Nara) and a spiritual figure (Narayana.)

The Epic of Gilgamesh (Sumerian mythology),  The Bhagavad Gita (Hindu mythology), and The Hero Twins (Mayan mythology) are all variants of the Nara-Narayana theme.

Enkidu, Arjuna, and Xbalanque are identified with Nara or the primeval man.

Additionally, a modern variant of the Nara-Narayana theme exists in the Captain Newfoundland series where Captain Canada is identified with Nara.

Even the Hebrew spiritualists eventually stumbled upon the fundamentally important energy of Nara.  The Kabbalists identify an “original man” separate from Adam from the Book of Genesis.  They refer to this “original man” as Adam Kadmon and treat him as a disembodied spiritual entity so as not to displace Adam Ha-Rishon’s status as first human.  However, had the Kabbalists used The Epic of Gilgamesh instead of the Book of Genesis, they would have easily linked Adam Kadmon to Enkidu and the primeval man.

Science and anthropology tell us that humans lived as hunter-gatherers for hundreds of thousands of years before civilization emerged.  Ancient spirituality makes reference to the primeval man in their story-telling.  Even Hebrew spiritualists make reference to an “original man” separate from Adam from the Book of Genesis: